It's snowing up here in the hinterlands, but that should cover up all the dirty stuff lying around the edges.

The Japan nuke disaster has strengthened local resistance to the license extension for Vermont Yankee, just a few miles down the road. The Vernon plant is similar in design to the one now deconstructing itself on the coast of Japan. Until recently, VY's little leaks and brief shutdowns didn't bother too many people, especially since it provides about one third of local power and lots of jobs. Now, it's different story.

An op-ed in today's local paper refers back to the Hungarian revolution of 1956, when, through Radio Free Europe, we encouraged rebellion then didn't back our words with action when the rebels really needed us. The US did, however, take in many refugees. Will that be the case with Libya? I, for one, hope so but we didn't take in many Iraqis (even the ones who helped us in the war), much to our shame.



 


Comments

03/22/2011 15:54

Hard to believe it's snowing there...and in the 80's here.

I'm heartened to see rethinking of nuclear power in the US. Even though most US plants aren't in tsunami zones, all are subject to wear-and-tear, and human error. And the worst, no solution for spent fuel.

Reply
paula
03/23/2011 14:23

Good to hear from you, Kathleen. Friend and Birds reader Pat has a terrific garden blog you might enjoy at commonweeder.com. To follow spring up here, look at her March 14 update: http://www.commonweeder.com/2011/03/14/monday-report-march-14/
It's snowing again tonight and tomorrow, but serious melting has already taken away much of the snowpack that's been on the ground for months. Spring can't be far behind.
As for nukes, yesterday the NRC approved a new license for Vermont Yankee, over objections from two state governments. This plant is smaller, but otherwise identical to the one falling apart in Japan. What were they thinking?

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Larry Burch
03/24/2011 17:38

Here in Iowa (we have only 1 nuclear plant inside the borders so far) the industry is seeking legislation that would enable the companies to start collecting new plant construction costs from current ratepayers. From what I've read recently, the utilities can no longer get investors to finance nuclear plants. The disaster in Japan will make it tougher to get the bill passed this year, but of course the "for" side is bombarding everyone with assurances that nuclear plants in the US are safe, that new plants will create jobs, etc. I suppose the spent fuel problem noted by Kathleen Scott is, from the point of view of the average voter and politician, "out-of-sight," and thus "out-of-mind."

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03/28/2011 23:52

Thank you for visiting my blog and for leaving fun comments. I have enjoued my first visit here looking at some of your postcards, reading your inspiring "About" section, and having my eyes opened to VY in this post. Shall return.

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